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Due Date Calendar


You can get an idea of when your child's birthday will be with a due date calendar. These calendars work similarly with conception calendars, which track the dates of your last period. Although it's definitely not a fine science, many times you can predict your due date. While the baby might not be born on the due date in fact, this rarely happens you'll know when it's supposed to be. In fact, only five percent of women actually deliver on their due date!

First, take the date of your previous menstrual cycle. Your due date is calculated by counting 40 weeks (280 days) from the first day of your last period. It's likely that your baby will be born within two weeks of the due date, either before or after the expected date. If your menstrual cycle is very irregular, or you really can't remember when your last period ended, it may be very difficult to calculate. If you know the exact date of conception due to an ovulation calendar or temperature tracking, you simply add 40 weeks onto that figure and there's your due date.

An ultrasound is a good predictor of due dates, so if you get one in your first trimester you may be able to figure it out with the help of the technician. If you're getting an ultrasound in later months, however, it's not very accurate with helping to determine when you'll deliver. Doctors and midwives want to know your expected due date as well, as if you are more than about 10 days past the date, inducing labor will be recommended. It can also help health care professionals know if your baby is the right size for his or her age.

Calculating your due date is usually fairly accurate in predicting the week or month your baby will be born in. It is possible to miscalculate, and you may find if your baby is larger or smaller than normal your doctor will reexamine your conception dates to see if they are incorrect. Also, don't use your due date calendar to plan events near your baby's birth. Your baby may be premature - a baby who is born before 37 weeks of pregnancy is considered a pre-term baby while other infants are very late. A due date calendar should be a guide of when your baby may come, but it's not meant to be an exact predictor of the day you'll go into labor.

 


 
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