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Orgasms While Pregnant

Orgasms While Pregnant


Sex during pregnancy can become even better for some women and their partners, especially since pregnancy hormones and increased blood flow can mean some intense orgasms for women. Many people, however, still believe that they can be dangerous during pregnancy, and might trigger premature labor. Physicians even advised against female orgasms during sex in the past, as they believed that the uterine contractions which followed could be a sign of preterm labor. Luckily for pregnant women everywhere, this is no longer the case! Doctors now know that as the hormone oxytocin is released during orgasm, the uterine contractions that follow are perfectly normal, and not a sign of early labor.

Before you have an orgasm, your heart rate and blood pressure increase, and sexual excitement is released in a rush. During conception, orgasm can help draw sperm into the cervix. Besides being a natural function, orgasms can be extremely pleasureable for both men and women.

Your orgasms may feel very different in pregnancy. Your vagina, labia and clitoris become more sensitive due to the increased blood circulation in your body. Since your blood production is higher during pregnancy, this can mean longer lasting orgasms, or even multiple orgasms. You might find that it's much easier for you to climax in pregnancy. A lot of women who have never experienced an orgasm outside of pregnancy have their first one after they become pregnant.

Some women find that they have mild cramping after orgasm. This is nothing to be alarmed about, and is an entirely normal part of pregnancy sex. It can become more noticeable in your third trimester, and is due to your uterus contracting and expanding. Cramps can last anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour, and are usually not painful. If you do find that they last for longer than one hour, you have unexplained bleeding or leakage, or feel sharp pain after intercourse, you should contact your health care provider right away. If you have a high risk pregnancy, such as a history of miscarriage or premature labor, you might also be advised to avoid orgasms or sexual activity during your pregnancy.

Your physician might recommend that you don't have orgasms during the last few weeks of your pregnancy, or may actually suggest them if you are past your due date. Studies have shown that orgasms in later pregnancy can actually cause contractions - a very pleasureable way to induce labor if you're waiting for baby to arrive!

 


 
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